17 Best Outdoor Games

17 of The Best Outdoor Games

POTATO RACE

RED INDIANS

GARDEN ROUNDERS

ACK RACE

TUG-O-WAR

THREE-LEGGED RACE

TORTOISE RACE

SKIPPING

JUMPING

BAMBOO RACE

BOUNCING BALL

AIR BALL

CROSS TOUCH

FOLLOW MY LEADER

OUT AND HOME

RELAY HOOP RACE

HOOP OBSTACLE RACE

 

POTATO RACE

This is one of the most popular of outdoor games. It may be played by players or adult s – on a lawn, or any ground where freedom of movement is possible.

Commence by placing in line five plates, about a metre and a half in front of each other. In each plate set a teaspoon. Walk to the right or left – say, fifteen metres and place five more pates exactly opposite the others, with five potatoes on each. Let the potatoes be of different sizes, but none very small.

Five players now line up by the five plates with spoons on them, and at the word “Go”, they must each pick up the spoon in the plate belonging to them, race to the plate opposite, scoop up a potato and race back again, depositing the potato in the empty plate.

Should a potato be dropped upon the way, the player must go back, scoop it off the ground, and race on again as fast as possible. This must continue until each player has transferred the five potatoes to the plate from which they started. The right hand only must be used.

If there are a number of players, divide them up into teams, the first two of each heat to race in the final.

RED INDIANS

This game is more suitable for boys than girls, although the latter join in with equal delight. If, however, you can secure two teams of boys, a far better result is assured.

One side is generally called Red Indians and the other British. The game is played as follows:

The British select a camp – the best place is on open space in a shrubby. Guards are put out at a different point to vie the alarm should the enemy attack. The camp is supposed to be in danger from Red Indians.

The Red Indians choose a camp, unknown to the British and send out scouts to discover the strength of the British and where their guards are placed. When one of the guards is located, the scouts retire to their camp and plan to take him, prisoner. The object of the Red Indians id to capture the British flag. Of course, each side selects a Commander-in-Chief and he chooses his captains etc. if the Chief acts intelligently, he will lead them to victory.

The Indian chief commences by sending a scout out to find the whereabouts of the British outpost when the scout ha ascertained this, he reports to his Chief, who at once sends a few men to capture one of these outposts. With his main force, the Chief makes off to another point. The attack is made on the British outpost, the Indians purposely create a great noise and try to drag the guard away. He, of course, will cry out for assistance; and it is more than likely that the whole of the British will rush to his rescue. Then the Red Indians, with a tremendous war-cry, swoop down on the camp and endeavour to capture the flat.

We have given an outline only of the game. For it is our experience that the boys invariably form plans of their own.

GARDEN ROUNDERS

The game of rounders is a very old English one, of which the national game of America (baeball9 is no doubt a variation. The correct number to play the game is eighteen - nine on each side; but this is not arbitrary, as five or six a side will suffice. Should you be playing five a side, it is polity to do away with one of the base.

Here we give a diagram showing how the bases should be arranged.

Home

Position No 1 is Home, and where the hitter stands. No 6 is where the bowler or pitcher stands. A tennis-ball is the most suitable for garden play and a cut-down broom handle will do for a bat. The pitcher must send full pitches to the hitter, who has a right to refuse any ball he does not fancy, the number generally being arrange beforehand. For instance, say that four balls are agreed upon. He can refuse three, but the next is his last chance, and he must run whether he hit it or not. If he misses it, the fielder standing behind him (acting wicket-keeper, as in cricket) catches the ball if he can, and places it on base No 1 before the hitter ha time to reach base No 2. This makes him out. The ball is not in play until it has been struck. When it is in play, and one of the fielders throws the ball up so that it hits one of the basses, that person is out. If a ball is caught, the whole side is out.

The last man in has the choice of three balls, but he cannot make use of any bases. He must, on hitting the ball, go right around – that is, from Home through bases 2, 3,4, back to home. Should one of the fielder send the ball into the keeper to place it in Hoe before the hitter arrives there, or should the latter be hit by the ball whilst running, the whole side is out? On the other hand, should he reach home before the ball and without being hit, it counts as a rounder and puts the whole side in again.

Any player, having hit the ball, can run to base No 1, and if he thinks it is safe, on to No 2 or 3 or right round; but if he stops at any bae, he must not start again until the ball is in play. No two players can stay at one base. The striker, having hit the ball and started to run, must drop the bat. The pitcher has the right to arrange the field as he pleases. Supposing the game has commenced and a ball hit. The striker runs through base No 2 and stops at No 3. Another takes the bat and hits the ball. The player at No 3 can run on through Nsm4 and 5, and back home. In this case, he is not out, but it does not score. To score, you must make a complete round without stopping at any base.

A rounder can b scored in any part of the game but the last man in must score around or the whole side is out.

The side who scores the most rounders wins.

SACK RACE

Boys keenly enjoy this race, which is also very entertaining to the spectators. Having obtained say, half a dozen sacks, the boys racing are instructed to get into them, when the Sacks are tied loosely around their necks. The boys are lined up, and at the word “Go” are started on their thirty-metre race. There will no doubt be many tumbles, but those who fall must rise again and continue the race. The styles of progression are varied and peculiar: some will jump along, while others will take a short run or shuffle. The competitor who comes in the first will, of course, win the race.

TUG-O-WAR

This game can be played by girls and boys, separately or together. First, make sides; the number does not matter so that it be the same on either side. Draw a line and place a rope across. Each side then takes hold of the rope (leaving about two metres clear either side of the line) and endeavours to pull the other just over. Whichever side is successful in two out of three trials, wins.

THREE-LEGGED RACE

This race is so well known that very little explanation is necessary. However, first tie the left leg of one boy to the right leg of another (round their ankles), and then when you have all the couples ready, start them off for, say, a fifty-metre race.

If those competing can obtain a little practice with their partners beforehand, it will be possible to produce quite a respectable pace.

TORTOISE RACE

This is necessarily a slow race, and over a very short course – about ten metres. Contrary to all other aces, it is the last in who wins.

Start the competitors off in a line and tell them they must keep moving – but as slowly as they please. Anyone who stops is disqualified. There should be two or three umpires watching, and should these detect any racer stopping, even for a second, the defaulter should at once be disqualified.

SKIPPING

Although this pastime does not require any explanation (every boy and girl being able to skip), we suggest that it is well to have a skipping-rope or two at every party. 

JUMPING

This, again, require little or no explanation. It will, however, amuse both boys and girls. Divide the time at your disposal between a long jump and then a high jump.

BAMBOO RACE

This is an original game requiring some skill, and it will be found very popular. You First secure a few bamboo poles, about 2 metres long – the longer the better. Each racer places one of these horizontally on his, or her, head. It is best for two to race at a time and the course to be in the shape of a square. Any player can balance a bamboo on his or her head and go at a good pace on the straight; but the un commences when the first corner is reached, for unless great care can be exercised in turning, the bamboo will certainly fall off. With a little skilful manoeuvring, the course can be successfully negotiated.

BOUNCING BALL

In this game, a large gutta-percha ball is required. Having placed the players in a circle – about two metres between each – throw the ball into the middle of them. One player then rushes out and bounce the ball on its rebound, with the palm of the hand once only. The player next to her then does likewise, and so the game goes on right around the circle. Any player bouncing the ball twice drops out, and the game continues until there is only one left in, who becomes the winner. 

AIR BALL

For this game, you want a strong air balloon, slightly heavier than the ordinary kind. Pace two sticks on the ground, about four metres apart, horizontally.

Then opposite them, twenty metres away, two more sticks. These are the goals there should be seven players on each side, but five will do. Choose one for goal-keeper, one for the right wing, and one for the left wing. The rest are forwards.

The opposing sides line up in the centre, facing each other, with about one yard between each line. The ball is then thrown into the air. Each side must endeavour (by hitting the ball only when it is in the air) to place it between the two posts opposite them. If successful, this counts as a goal. Should the ball touch the ground the umpire must again throw it into the air, and at the place where it fell.

CROSS TOUCH

This is an excellent game for the garden. Any number can take part; it must be played “fast and furious”. One boy is selected as Touch. It is then his business to name another boy, whom he at once chases and endeavours to touch; but should any other boy pass between them, he then has to rush after that player; and again, if anyone else crosses between them, he must at once run after that particular one; and so on, until he touches a player who has not been crossed, who at once changes places with him, and in his turn becomes Touch.

FOLLOW THE LEADER

Any number can take part in this game, which then will require a leader, preferably a player with some imagination.

First line up all in a long row, each behind the other, with two metres between them, the leader being about ten metres ahead. Whatever the leader does, all must do. Should anyone fail, he must retire to the end of the row but continue in the game. The object is to be head of the row.

Now the leader may do a thousand different things which all must copy, but he should never attempt anything dangers. We have seen this game played by boys all of about the same age (ten to twelve years) with a daring leader, who, in his progress, caught the branch of a tree pulled himself up and over the other side, and then rushed off, and leapt over a ditch filled with water. Of course, some failed and had to go back to the end of the row. Let the leader do anything he chooses – the greater the variety the better, but he should avoid foolish stunts such as jumping over a cucumber frame. One of the boys might, in such an event, fail, and fall on the glass, with disastrous results. Some play this game with the rule that if a boy fails at anything the dear doe, he at once goes out of the game. We here give a few stunts:

Climb a tree. Turn a somersault. Turn a Catherine-wheel. Hop for ten metres on right leg, then change to left leg. Run on all fours.

Jump a flower-bed.

Run backwards.

Bunny jump.

Physical exercises.

Hop, holding other foot behind, the in front.

Hold little finger of the left hand with right hand, then put the right foot through, then left, and bring arms up behind into an upright position without relinquishing hold of the little finger. Now return by the same stages to a starting position.

Fold arms, lie down, and get up again without unfolding arms.

Jump a bush

Of course, an umpire must be watching for failures.

OUT AND HOME

In this game, first choose sides – as many as you please, so that the number of either side be equal. Next, mark out a fairly large space as Home. Then toss for choice – that is, whether you will keep Home or go out to hide.

One side now goes out and hides and when a signal is given, the Home side has to find them, and touch them before they reach Home. Leave two at Home to defend it, while the others go out to look for the enemy.

When once the signal is to give, a boy need not wait for anyone to discover him but should work his way round buses etc, and finally make a rush for Home. If he reaches this without being touched it counts one to his side. If, however, he is touched, he retires as a prisoner, and it counts a point scored by the Home side. Whichever side secures the most point wins. Should one of the seekers discover a boy hiding behind a bush and cry out “I spy Dick” (or “Harry” as the case may be), that player must at once dash for home. Of course, the spy shouts in a loud voice, so that the two Home defenders may hear they then at once know that a rush is being made for Home by someone; but while their attention is directed to that particular boy, other may choose this opportunity and sprint for Home. If girls are paying, an equal number should be on either side, for boys usually fun faster than girls. This may be described as one of the best outdoor party games.

RELAY HOP RACK

This game is usually played on a lawn. First, mark out a fairly large circle. This may be done by placing articles on the ground (say ten metres apart) to mark the course to be taken. A hoop (an iron one is best of moderate size) will be needed, and two strong sticks with which to trundle it along. Let two boys who will be captains, pick sides. It does not matter how many players but the sides must be equal in number. Toss for the choice of innings; then, when all is ready, the captain must say in what order the boys are to go.

No 1 starts off as fast as he can with the hoop he must keep on the outside of the articles on the ground and race back to the starting post – when the next boy with the second stick, must take his place while the hoop is still trundling. He must go around in like manner as fast as possible, then pass the hoop on to boy number 3, who has taken possession of the stick used by Number 1; and so on, until the team has been round. On no account must the hoop be touched by either hand unless it falls, when it may be picked up and started again in exactly the same place. The race must be timed; and when all the boys on one side have been once round, the umpire must declare how long they have taken. Then the opposing team begin and it I obvious that their object is to complete the rounds in less time than their opponent’s team with the shortest time naturally wins. A great deal depends on how quickly one boy takes over the hoop from another. If this is on smartly, much time will be saved. The game may be played equally well by girls.

HOOP OBSTACLE RACE

This is a pleasing variety of other races. First, mark out any kind, of course, you think desirable, and then scatter various obstacles about the same. For example, say ten metres from the start place two bricks about 15 centimetres apart, then five metres beyond these, a block of wood; and so on, to the end of the course. We give a diagram which will suggest the track the hoop should take. Each player now takes his turn. Those completing the course without mishap playoff again, until on only is left in, who becomes the winner. The first player starts with the hoop and stick and has to go around or through all of the obstacles successfully. Having started the hoop, he must touch it with nothing but the stick. Should the hoop fall to the ground or come in contact with any of the obstacles, he is out, and the next player then tries. Should it be found that several of the players have completed the course fairly easily, the umpire (who is chosen at the commencement of the game) must alter the position of the obstacles to make the task more difficult. He can, for instance, reduce the space between the bricks to 10 centimetres. This game is so fascinating that the grown-ups will be unable to resist its appeal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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